Posts tagged museum

MALBA in Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

MALBA, Buenos Aires, Argentina

MALBA, Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

 

By Roy Heale

Just on the eastern edge of the Palermo Woods and close to the Alcorta Shopping Mall, is the home of MALBA—the Museum of Latin American Art of Buenos Aires. Whether you are an art officianado or just interested in Latin American culture, this is a must visit when in Buenos Aires. The modern, stunning grand entrance and three storey atrium, create a bright environment to display these unique artworks.

The Atrium

The Atrium

MALBA – Fundación Costantini opened its doors on September 21, 2001. It is a not-for-profit institution featuring the permanent exhibit of the Costantini Collection, and also a dynamic cultural center, that constantly updates art and film exhibitions and develops cultural activities.

The Costantini Collection consists of a selection of more than five hundred works, including drawings, paintings, sculptures and objects by artists from Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico, Uruguay and Venezuela.

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The mission of MALBA is to collect, preserve, research and promote Latin American art from the onset of the 20th century to the present. This also involves educating the public to foster their knowledge in Latin American artists, in the diversity of cultural and artistic holdings in this region, sharing this education with both with the national and the international community.

The Museum’s objectives are to reinsert Latin American art in the world setting, to address cultural and educational needs of the public, to exhibit a broad Latin American art collection and to generate artistic exchange with other cultural institutions. These objectives are achieved by the promotion of the most important national and international artists, by the promotion of the knowledge in Latin American art, by the creation of an overall program in educational services, and by the promotion of professional curatorial.

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Since its opening to the public in 2001, one of the museum’s principal institutional objectives has been the permanent display of most of its artistic patrimony, offering to visitors innovative lectures and different approximations to the history of art in Latin America.

From the first modern and avant-garde movements to the more contemporary productions of the late 20th century, the collection’s exhibits vary according to the dynamics of the Annual Program of Acquisitions and to the generous donations received from artists, their family members, and private collectors.

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Useful Information:
Museum Hours:
Thursday through Monday and Holidays from Noon to 20:00Hrs.
Wednesday from Noon till 21:00 Hrs.
Closed Tuesday.
Admission: (Shown in Argentine Pesos)
Adults: $32.
Teachers and Seniors: $16.
Students: $16.
Children under 5: Free.
Wednesday:
General: $16.
Students: Free.

MALBA Cinema:
General: $25
Students and Seniors: $13
Subscription: $114. Students and seniors: $58

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Contact Information:
info@malba.org.ar
Avenida Figueroa Alcorta 3415, Buenos Aires, Argentina
+54 (11) 4808-6500
www.malba.org.ar

Evita Treasures in Palermo Museum

Museo Evita

 

By Roy Heale

Nobody knows for sure at what point Maria Eva Duarte de Perón became known as Evita and similarly when she became a gay icon. But everybody knows that Evita became a legend in Argentina’s social politics and world renowned during her short thirty-three year life span (1919-1952). Immortalized by the 1978 Andrew Lloyd Weber musical Evita and later by the Hollywood movie of the same name starring Madonna, Eva Perón’s life story is mythical. In the city of Buenos Aires there are many monuments and highlights reflecting her life’s achievements and the Evita Museum shares her momentos with visitors.

If it were possible, Evita probably was watching over her beloved Casa Rosada the night in July 2010 when the Same-Sex Marriage Act was signed into law by a female president of Argentina—Cristina Fernández de Kirchner—reflecting upon her earlier contributions to this momentous occasion.

Museum Entrance

This is a true rags-to-riches story of how a young fifteen year old girl from a small rural village in Argentina heads to the big city of Buenos Aires in 1934 where she creates for herself a life of political power and influence which changes her country forever. The young Eva Duarte was a stage, radio, and film actress before meeting her future husband Colonel Juan Peron in 1944. The couple fell madly in love, married in 1945 and Juan Peron became president of Argentina in 1946. As the First Lady of Argentina she ran the Ministries of Labour and Health, championed woman’s liberation, created her own Foundation, fought for the poor, defended equal rights for all, and founded the Female Peronist Party. The Argentine Congress gave her the official title of “Spiritual Leader of the Nation” and she received a “Head of State” funeral despite the fact that she never held such a position. Without a doubt she earned her legendary status and left a remarkable legacy for all to admire and respect.

With such a colourful history to explore the Evita Museum offers a fascinating look at her life. From her involvement with the CGT (Argentina’s main labour union), to her outstanding speeches at the May’s Square Balcony of the Casa Rosada, her Mausoleum at the Recoleta Cemetery, and the National Library which was her one-time residence, this city is full of fascinating tidbits and representations of her life.

The Evita Museum in Palermo is housed in an early 1900s Italian Renaissance style mansion. This edifice was once a shelter for women and children with no resources, opened in 1948 by the Eva Peron Foundation. Today this magnificent building is home to the largest and most important collection of Evita memorabilia, one of her cars, historic black and white news film clips, her personal furniture, a bottle of her perfume, personal effects, clothes, and more. The Evita Museum opened on July 26th 2002 on the fiftieth anniversary of Evita’s death.

Evita's Dresses

The historic edifice is located on a quiet tree-lined residential avenue at 2988 Lafinur Street in Palermo close to the Botanical Gardens. It forms part of the cultural tourist trail of the City of Buenos Aires (together with the Decorative Art Museum, the National Fine Arts Museum, the Palais de Glace and the Latin American Art Museum). It is open Tuesdays to Sundays (and holidays) from 11 AM. to 7 PM and last admission is about half an hour before closing.

The walls of this building once echoed with the strong voice of Evita and the joyful voices of the women and children who found refuge in it. Now it houses the Museo Evita, a living museum where people can come to know, understand and appreciate the life of the most important woman of Argentine history.

The Original Kitchen

You can also enjoy gourmet meals in the museum restaurant which also has a beautiful garden courtyard for outdoor dining in the warmer months.

For More Information Visit: www.evitaperon.org

Beatles Museum in Buenos Aires

Beatles Memorabilia

By Roy Heale

It may not be the traditional Liverpool surroundings for the Fab Four, but the recently opened Beatles Museum in Buenos Aires boasts an amazing collection of memorabilia. Created by 53-year-old Rodolfo Vazquez the museum features thousands of items related to the famous foursome from England. The Beatlemania collecting obsession began for the Argentine accountant when he was just 10 years old.

 

Rodolfo Vazquez

 

“With the song ‘In My Life,’ on the Rubber Soul album I fell in love with the Beatles,” Vazquez told The Associated Press. He holds the 2001 Guinness World Record for owning the world’s largest collection of the legendary rock band’s memorabilia. At that point, Guinness noted that he had 5,612 items in the attic of his home in Buenos Aires. His hoard has grown to more than 8,500 records, gadgets, puppets and games since then, more than 2,200 of which are on display in the Beatle Museum that just opened this year at Paseo La Plaza, 1660 Corrientes Avenue 1660, in an area of the capital city where tourists throng. Museum visitors will be able to view items like a check signed by drummer Ringo Starr, a large collection of album covers, toys, figurines, and a brick from The Cavern Club, where the band was discovered in the 1960s.

 

Museum and Cavern Club Entrances

There are Beatles museums in Liverpool, England, and Hamburg, Germany, that display memorabilia along with objects from the band members’ lives, and other private collections as well. But this storefront museum stands out for the sheer quantity of pieces, carefully arranged in display cases and on the walls. There are objects for all tastes: a box of condoms with the name of John Lennon and Yoko Ono, a wig that says it adjusts to any head size, and signed pictures of the four musicians. Vazquez also keeps accumulating objects, either buying or trading for them with other collectors around the world.

 

The Fab Four

 

The Beatles broke up in 1970, but there’s no letup in interest about the band: When their song list was added to iTunes last year, more than 2 million individual songs and 450,000 copies of Beatles albums were sold in the first week.

 

Although the Beatles never performed in Argentina, people here seem to have a soft spot for them, ensuring that cover bands have regular gigs. Many such bands play in Vazquez’s “The Cavern Club,” a bar next to the museum named after the Liverpool nightclub.

 

Vazquez claims he doesn’t know the total value of his private collection, which also includes record covers, autographs, toys, original pictures, concert programs, and cups and plates with Beatle images. Other rarities are four music boxes with figures of John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr. Vazquez even has certified copies of their birth certificates. Rarities include  a hunk of the stage of Hamburg’s Star Club, a strip club where the musicians worked as the house band, at that point with Pete Best as drummer. A pair of drumsticks signed by Best, who was replaced by Ringo Star in 1962, is
in the Buenos Aires museum.

 

There’s also a piece of the floor of Strawberry Fields, a Salvation Army orphanage near
Lennon’s boyhood home whose name inspired the 1967 psychedelic rock tune “Strawberry Fields Forever.”

 

Getting the chance to show his treasures to fellow fans is immensely satisfying to Vazquez
and thousands have already rushed to the museum to relive Beatlemania at its best!

http://www.thecavern.com.ar

Paseo La Plaza, 1660 Corrientes Avenue,
Buenos Aires, Argentina